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New York Chapter

The New York Chapter organizes a variety of cultural and social events for its members throughout the year. Past highlights have included special receptions at the French Consulate; a private visit to Old Westbury gardens; and their Annual Gala Dinner at the Metropolitan Club and the Union Club.

Proceeds from Chapter benefits are designated for specific grants which members have voted to support. The New York Chapter has raised funds for restoration projects at the Petite Malmaison and the Château de La Roche Courbon in France, as well as for the Morris Jumel Mansion and New York City Hall and the French Consulate in New York. Currently the New York Chapter is funding grants to Monticello, Jardins d’Albertas, Château de La Bussière and Deyo House in New Paltz, NY. Future Chapter events are being planned in order to support a grant to the Church of Saint-Germain-des-Pres in Paris.

Guy N. Robinson and Odile de Schiétère-Longchampt are Co-Chairmen of French Heritage Society's New York Chapter.

For further information or to learn more about Membership, please contact the New York Chapter directly.

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The Invention of the Riviera

Please join us for a Lecture on Tuesday, April 7th by David Garrard Lowe

The French Riviera was, until the early 19th century, a region of olive groves and sleepy fishing villages, which began to change dramatically during the 1830s with the arrival of an English noble, Lord Brougham, at Cannes. Later in the 19th century, great numbers of Britons, led by Queen Victoria and Edward, Prince of Wales, began coming to the South of France to escape England’s gray winters. With astonishing rapidity, Cannes, Nice, and Monte Carlo became virtual English enclaves. However, it was the Americans who transformed the Riviera into a summer resort in the 1920s. Gerald and Sarah Murphy, Cole Porter, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway, expatriates all, made Antibes and Beaulieu-sur-Mer the places to be seen. The Riviera was transformed from a provincial backwater into the celebrated Côte d’Azur, a gilded world of casinos, yachts, and private villas.

David Garrard Lowe is a lecturer, cultural historian, and author. His articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, American Heritage, House & Garden, and City Journal. His books include Stanford White’s New York, Lost Chicago, Chicago Interiors, Beaux Arts New York, and Art Deco New York. Mr. Lowe is president of The Beaux Arts Alliance in New York. In 2012 he was honored by the French government with the insignia of Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. In April of 2013, in recognition of his best-selling book Lost Chicago, Mr. Lowe was presented with the first annual David Garrard Lowe Award for Preservation by the association Preservation Chicago. He resides in New York City.

Lecture 6:30 PM, Tuesday, April 7th, 2015 followed by cocktails

The New York Junior League
130 East 80th Street
Harriman Room
(between Park and Lexington Avenues)

Cost:
FHS Members tickets $50 (click here to purchase tickets)
Non-Members & Guests $65 (click here to purchase tickets)

You may also RSVP by phone: 212-759-6846, or by e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
Space is limited and reservations will be on a first come first serve basis.

How Paris Became Paris: The Invention of the Modern City

Please join us for a Lecture on Wednesday, April 22nd by Prof. Joan DeJean

How Paris Became Paris SmallAt the beginning of the 17th century, Paris was known for isolated monuments but had not yet put its brand on urban space. Like other European cities, it was still emerging from its medieval past. But in a mere century Paris would be transformed into the modern and mythic city we know today.

Though most people associate the signature characteristics of Paris with the public works of the nineteenth century, Joan DeJean demonstrates that the Parisian model for urban space was, in fact, invented two centuries earlier, when the first complete design for the French capital was drawn up and implemented. As a result, Paris saw many seminal changes. A century of planned development made Paris both beautiful and exciting. It gave people reasons to be out in public, as never before and as nowhere else. And it gave Paris its modern identity as a place that people dreamed of seeing. By 1700, Paris had become the capital that would revolutionize our conception of the city and of urban life.

Joan DeJean is Trustee Professor at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of ten books on French literature, history, and material culture, including most recently The Age of Comfort: When Paris Discovered Casual—and the Modern Home Began and The Essence of Style: How the French Invented High Fashion, Fine Food, Chic Cafés, Style, Sophistication, and Glamour. She lives in Philadelphia and, when in Paris, on the street where the number 4 bus began service on July 5, 1662.

Lecture: 6:30 PM, Wednesday, April 22nd, followed by cocktails

The New York Junior League
130 East 80th Street
Schmelzer Room – 4th Floor
(between Park and Lexington Avenues)

Cost:
FHS Members tickets $50 (click here to purchase tickets)
Non-Members & Guests $65 (click here to purchase tickets)

You may also RSVP by phone: 212-759-6846, or by e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
Space is limited and reservations will be on a first come first serve basis.